The Niger Delta and the Politics of Usable Nigerians

Young men struggle with a barrel of petrol in Yenagoa, near Oloibiri. Most inhabitants of the Niger Delta do not have access to reliable and affordable energy. Photo by Ed Kashi

By Omolade Adunbi

Omolade_AdunbiLife expectancy in the Niger Delta averages just 40 years, compared to between 53 and 55 within Nigeria as a whole. Yet, the Nigerian state and the multinational corporations operating in the Niger Delta have refused to address the historical processes that led from a ‘usable’ Niger Delta of the 1950s, to a current population of unemployed, ‘unusable’, youths castigated to the margins of Nigerian society.

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Oil Theft, Pollution and the Politics of Modular Refineries

The-approach-of-military-Joint-Task-Force-which-routinely-destroys-illegal-refineries-exacerbates-environmental-pollution

FynefaceRecent pronouncements on modular refineries by the federal government have ignited excitement among youths seeking legitimate employment away from artisanal refining of crude oil. However, modular refineries are neither a community development alternative nor a sustainable option for addressing widespread youth unemployment. Social Action calls for a new conversation to identify alternatives to the destructive petroleum industry.

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Advocacy/Communication Interns

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Social Action is searching for competent and skilled Advocacy/Communication Interns with ability to contribute effectively to achieving organizational objectives.

Location: Abuja, Nigeria
Start date: July 2017

Overview

Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action) works to promote resource democracy, social justice and human rights in the sectors of energy, mining, the environment and climate change, trade and public budgets. We engage in research and monitoring, popular education and advocacy in solidarity with communities, activists and scholars working to promote social change in Nigeria and other countries in the Gulf of Guinea region of Africa.

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Shortchanged: How the Senate’s Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB) Fails the Environment and Local Communities

From right to left: Doifie Buokoribo (Board member), Isaac ‘Asume’ Osuoka (Executive Director), Vivian Bellonwu-Okafor (Head of Advocacy) addressing the media at Social Action’s National Advocacy Centre, Abuja

From right to left: Doifie Buokoribo (Board member), Isaac ‘Asume’ Osuoka (Executive Director), Vivian Bellonwu-Okafor (Head of Advocacy) addressing the media at Social Action’s National Advocacy Centre, Abuja

 

Based on the text of the Press Conference by the Social Development Integrated Centre (Social Action), June 21, 2017, Abuja

The Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB) was passed by the Senate in May 2017 (the Federal House of Representatives is still working on the bill). Social Action has undertaken a thorough study of the PIGB. The result of our examination is contained in the briefing paper, “The Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB), 2017: Implications for the Environment and Local Communities”.

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THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY GOVERNANCE BILL (PIGB), 2017: Implications for the Environment and local communities

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In May 2017, the Nigerian Senate passed the Petroleum Industry Governance Bill (PIGB), which is revised version of the original Petroleum Industry Bill (PIB) that was presented to the National Assembly by the Yar’adua administration in 2008. This briefing paper by Social Action provides an analysis of the PIGB, which focuses almost exclusively on the creation of new commercial entities to manage privatized national petroleum assets. There is a glaring neglect of host communities’ interest in the proposed new institutions. The PIGB does not provide for health, safety and environment concerns; there is no provision for an end to gas flaring. The PIGB proposes to remove all powers of the Federal Ministry of Environment (and its agencies) over environmental regulation and enforcement in the petroleum sector. Read Full Report